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Sample Drip Campaign Emails

    Copy and paste the emails below into the onTrackCRM email editor.

    • In onTrackCRM, Click Marketing > Campaigns
    • Select the desired campaign or create a new one
    • Scroll Down to the Campaign Email section and click Compose Email
    • Copy and paste the Subject and Body for each email below, then click Save (not Send)
    • After all emails have been created, Click Add to Drip next to each email
    • The emails will appear under the Drip Campaign section
    • Click Up or Down to adjust the sequence the emails will be sent out
    • Update the Days to Wait field and click Save (this must be done for each line) to adjust how many days before the next email in sequence is sent

    Email 1

    Subject: Return on Investment vs Return on Equity - You may be surprised on your investment's performance
    Body:

    How Do I Measure My Investment Property’s Cash on Equity Return?

     Would you put your money in the bank for a low interest rate?  Probably not. But unfortunately many investors who have owned their investment properties over time have exhausted depreciation (a major tax benefit), and are earning a disappointing annual return on their equity.  The Return (or growth) on Investment (ROI) has done well over the years. However, the Return on Equity (ROE), that is your income from it (if not analyzed by a tax or financial planner) could be unknowingly poor. 

     Here is a simplified example of computing your ROE:

     

    1)  Annual Gross Income

    Monthly rent times 12 = $____________

     2)  Annual Expenses

    Include Monthly Mortgage payments times 12, then add Insurance, Property Taxes, Maintenance, Utilities, and all other Expenses spent annually.   $____________

     3)  Annual Net Income  $____________  

    Subtract 2 (Expenses) from  1  (Gross Income)

     4) Estimated Net Equity of Your Investment Property 

    (Your Realtor will assist you with this) $____________

     

     

    5) To arrive to your Property’s Approximate Cash on Equity Return, take 3 (Net Income) and divide by 4 (Estimate Net Equity).

    This is your Investment Property’s Estimated Cash on Equity Annualized Rate of Return____________%

     Surprised?  If your annual percentage rate of equity return is disappointing, perhaps it’s time to consider…

     

    2 possible solutions for better cash flow;

     

    1-      Refinance the property and acquire additional investment real estate which can grow in both ROI and ROE;

     

                                            - or -

    2-      Sell and acquire superior properties via a §1031 Tax Deferred Exchange.

     

    The §1031 Tax Deferred Exchange is one of the last tax shelters allowed by the Internal Revenue Service.  It is a transaction in which a taxpayer exchanges investment real estate for other investment property which allows one to defer the payment of: Federal Capital Gain Taxes, the Recapture of Deprecation Taxes, and California State Taxes.  The IRS allows this for real property held for investment purposes, or the productive use in a trade or business anywhere in the USA.  This basically includes any real estate held for investment EXCEPT your primary residence and second family home.  Now you can move forward into more profitable investment property with a greater percentage of equity return (ROE) and possibly a new adjusted Depreciation schedule. 

    I can show you how you can double, triple, and even quadruple your current performance.  Contact me to schedule a free, confidential consultation.

    Warmest Regards,

    $users-signature$

    Email 2

    Subject: 7 Important Questions Every Investor Needs to Ask
    Body:
     7 Important Questions Every Investor Needs to Ask

    Real Estate Investors continue to look for ways to manage their investment portfolio and to create the most of its potential.

    Here are 7 essential questions to consider:

    1. How do I maximize the equity which has grown in recent years and leverage it into a better real estate portfolio, with greater cash flow?

    2. How hard is my rental property working, and is there a way to measure its cash producing performance?

    3. Am I utilizing all the Depreciation tax breaks I can?

    4. How can I reduce the stress and time spent managing my properties without sacrificing income or growth potential?

    5. Can I reduce my risk factors including market adjustments by diversifying my portfolio?

    6. Am I holding Title to my properties in a way to protect my estate?

    7. How can I minimize or defer the tax burden for myself and my heirs, and still grow my asset base?   


    In most situations, investment property amounts to our most important and lucrative investments.  Doesn’t it make sense to maximize their growth and potential?

    If you’re not sure of the answers, please feel free to call.  As a real estate investments specialist, I am here to provide you with direction in these areas.

    I can show you how you can double, triple, and even quadruple your current performance.  Contact me to schedule a free, confidential consultation.


    Warmest Regards,

    $users-signature$

     

    Email 3

    Subject: One of the Last Tax Shelters
    Body:

    One of the Last Tax Shelters

    The §1031 Tax Deferred Exchange is one of the last tax shelters allowed by the Internal Revenue Service.  It is a transaction in which a taxpayer exchanges investment property for like- kind investment property, which defers the payment of capital gain taxes and the recapture of Deprecation taxes.  The IRS defines like-kind property as all real property held for investment purposes, or the productive use in a trade or business.  This basically includes any real estate held for investment except your primary residence and second family home.

    There are some important rules which must be followed to effectuate a valid exchange:

    •    The exchange must be opened before the close of Escrow on the relinquished (sale) property.

    •    The taxpayer must identify the replacement (acquired) property within 45 days after the close of the relinquished (sale) property.

    •    The taxpayer must close Escrow on the replacement property within 180 days from the close of the relinquished property, or, before the date the tax return filing is due for the tax year in which the relinquished property was transferred - whichever comes first.

    •    The taxpayer must reinvest all net proceeds into the replacement property.

    •    The taxpayer must obtain a debt of equal or greater amount on the replacement property.

    By following these rules, the taxpayer shelters capital gains tax into the replacement property, and defers the recapture of depreciation tax.  This creates more buying power for the taxpayer than if the capital gains tax was paid.  Also, by deferring the payment of capital gains tax, the taxpayer gets to invest the taxes into the replacement property interest free from the IRS. 
    The 1031 Tax Deferred Exchange also avoids the California Withholding Tax.

    I can show you how you can double, triple, and even quadruple your current performance.  Contact me to schedule a free, confidential consultation.

    Warmest Regards,

    $users-signature$

     

    Email 4

    Subject: Investment Diversification: Can My Real Estate be at Risk?
    Body:

    Investment Diversification:
    Can My Real Estate be at Risk?

    Are all my Investment “eggs in one basket”?

    Diversification or balance in an investment portfolio can be critical to success as market conditions change and shifts take place.  There can be great increases when the market is going up, but unfortunately when an economic downturn occurs, it can lead to severe financial loss.  A large percentage of successful investors will not restrict their holdings to just one type of investment (i.e. stocks, bonds, mutual funds, etc).  Investors tend to include investment Real Estate to create diversification or a well balanced portfolio.

     

    Is my Investment Real Estate portfolio Balanced?

    Real Estate has proved itself for decades as an attractive investment.  But can I create added risk if I own only one property type?  For example, if I own only single-family rentals, can I be missing out on greater cash flow as opposed to owning multiple unit properties?  What about vacancy possibilities?  The risk could be lessen in multi-family as opposed to a vacant single-family rental, which generates no rent.  But what if the residential market turns flat; could I have done better by complementing my holdings with some Retail or Commercial property?  Different property types or a Balanced portfolio can be a strong contributing factor to economic Diversification.

    How about Geographical Diversification?

     

    When one accumulates investment real estate in a concentrated geographical location (usually near to where the investor resides), possible dangers can derive from natural disasters concentrated in that particular area (Earthquakes, Fires, Hurricanes, etc).  Those properties as a whole can be at risk or potential great loss within that environment because all holdings are in a concentrated geographical area.  What happens if that particular district becomes economically sluggish and other counties of the State or regions of the Country are thriving because of business expansion?  Perhaps that investor can be missing out on great appreciation opportunities.

    The §1031 Tax Deferred Exchangeis a method to achieving property diversification, and is one of the last tax shelters allowed by the Internal Revenue Service.  It is a transaction in which a taxpayer exchanges investment property for like-kind investment property, which defers the payment of Capital Gain Taxes and the Recapture of Deprecation Tax.  The IRS defines like-kind property as all real property held for investment purposes, or the productive use in a trade or business.  This basically includes any real estate held for investment except your primary residence and second family home.  This creates more buying power for the taxpayer than if the Capital Gains Tax was paid, and possibly creates a new schedule of additional Deprecation to take advantage of.  By deferring the payment of Capital Gains Tax, the taxpayer gets to invest the owed Tax dollars into the replacement property interest free from the IRS and State.  The 1031 Tax Deferred Exchange also avoids the California Withholding Tax.

    I can show you how you can double, triple, and even quadruple your current performance.  Contact me to schedule a free, confidential consultation.

    Warmest Regards,

    $users-signature$

     

    Email 5

    Subject: Depreciation:  Lower Taxes with Investment Property
    Body:

    Depreciation:

    Can I Lower Taxes

    with Investment Property?

     One of the largest tax breaks for owners of investment property comes in the form of Depreciation, or the loss in value of a property over time due to physical deterioration. In other words, it's the decrease in value of property over time as the building structure begins to wear and tear with age.  The IRS allows investment property owners to take a tax loss every year based on this depreciation over the useful life of the asset, known as the cost-recovery period.  This can reduce an investor’s taxable income by thousands of dollars each year.  Here are some items which the IRS allows a depreciation schedule:

     

    ·         Residential Rental Property (building) – 27.5 years

    ·         Commercial Rental Property (building) – 39 years

    ·         Refrigerators, ranges, dishwashers, carpeting, furniture – 5 years

    ·         Land improvements:  (landscaping & shrubbery, fences, sidewalks, septic systems, water pipes) – 15 years

    Tax depreciation on a residential or commercial investment property is a deduction against assessable income allowing the owner to reduce the amount of taxation payable.

    In some situations investors who have owned their properties for more than 20 years have created new depreciation to help offset taxes by utilizing a §1031 Tax Deferred Exchange.  The §1031 Tax Deferred Exchange is one of the last tax shelters allowed by the Internal Revenue Service.  It is a transaction in which a taxpayer exchanges investment property for like- kind investment property, which defers the payment of capital gain taxes and the recapture of Deprecation taxes.  The IRS defines like-kind property as all real property held for investment purposes, or the productive use in a trade or business.  This basically includes any real estate held for investment except your primary residence and second family home.

     Questions?  Give me a call.

    I can show you how you can double, triple, and even quadruple your current performance.  Contact me to schedule a free, confidential consultation.

    Warmest Regards,

    $users-signature$

     

    Email 6

    Subject: How to Measure  Return on Investment (ROI) Before I Buy or Exchange
    Body:

    How to Measure

    Return on Investment (ROI)
    Before I Buy or Exchange

    Return on Investment or ROI is a performance measure used to evaluate the financial return on investment property. To calculate ROI, the return of investment is divided by the cost of the investment.  The result is expressed as a percentage, or a ratio.

     Many Investors and banks determine this ratio by using various indicators.  One method is the Capitalization Rate (also known as the CAP Rate).  The CAP rate is calculated without considering the debt.  Determining the return on an investment before the debt isolates the merits of the investment on its own. 

     A second useful metric is to determine the Cash on Cash percentage return on the investment’s down payment.

     A third method is to determine the Gross Rent Multiplier (GRM).  The GRM is not a very precise tool for ascertaining value. However, it is an excellent first quick value assessment tool to see if further, more detailed analysis can be warranted. If the GRM is too high or low compared to recent comparable sold properties, it may indicate a problem with the property or gross over-pricing.

     The following are simplified formulas in determining the CAP rate, the Cash on Cash return, and the Gross Rent Multiplier: 

     First, determine the Net Operating Income or NOI

    (Gross Annual Income – Annual Expenses)

    1- Total all scheduled gross Annual Income of the building.

    2- Total all Annual Expenses including: Taxes, Insurance, Utilities, Trash, Landscaping, Professional fees, Management fees, any annual Maintenance fees, etc. Do not include debt expenses.

    3- Subtract Annual Expenses from the Gross Annual Income. 

    The result is the Net Operating Income of a property.

     

    CAP Rate   (NOI / Sales Price)

    Divide the NOI by the Sales Price.

    This provides the Capitalization Rate of a property.

     

    Cash On Cash Return   (Cash Flow / Down Payment)

    1- Estimate the Annual Income of a property.

    2- Subtract all Annual Expenses and Loan Payments.

    3- This totals your Annual Net Cash Flow.

    4- Divide the Annual Cash Flow (#3) by the Down Payment.

    The percentage is the Cash on Cash return is on your down payment.

     

    Gross Rent Multiplier   (Market Value /  Annual Gross Income)

    The asking price of the property divided by the Annual Gross Income.

     

    Things to Consider:

    ·         The higher the CAP Rate, the greater the cash flow.  Your goal should be to locate properties with higher CAP Rates.

    ·         Seasoned buyers look for properties where rents can be raised, thus creating greater cash flow.

    ·         The condition and location of the investment.

    ·         The ability of the property to appreciate in time.

    ·         A new or adjusted Depreciation schedule to help shelter income.

     

    I can show you how you can double, triple, and even quadruple your current performance.  Contact me to schedule a free, confidential consultation.

    Warmest Regards,

    $users-signature$

     

    Email 7

    Subject: The Six Types of  §1031 Tax Deferred Exchanges
    Body:

    The Six Types of §1031 Tax Deferred Exchanges

     

    1- Simultaneous:  When both relinquished and replacement properties close escrow the same day.*

    2- DelayedAfter the relinquished has closed escrow,the replacement property must be identified within the first 45 days, and purchased within 180 days. *

    3- ReverseAllows the purchase of the replacement property to close escrow before the relinquished property closes escrow.  The relinquished property must be identified within 45 days after escrow has closed on the purchase property, and the sale must close escrow no later than 180 days. *

    4- HybridCombining both Delayed and Reverse Exchanges involving multiple investment properties. *

    5- Build to SuitAllows the taxpayer to construct improvements on the replacement property during the course of the exchange. *

    6- Personal PropertyAn Exchange involving personal property, (e.g. airplane for an airplane, boat for a boat or a restaurant business for a restaurant business), to be used for investment or the productive use in a trade or business. *

     

    * Each type of Exchange involves special rules and requirements promulgated from the IRS.  Remember that all 1031 Tax-Deferred Exchanges must be set up prior to the close of escrow. 

    I can show you how you can double, triple, and even quadruple your current performance.  Contact me to schedule a free, confidential consultation.

    Warmest Regards,

    $users-signature$ 

     

    .

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